If you have spent time and money creating a new design or product, a design registration can help you prevent competitors from unfairly taking advantage of those efforts. Typically the look of a product can be a key influencer in a purchasing decision. The owner of...

Registrable designs include designs which are not purely functional and which have not been previously applied to any manufactured article. There are a few articles specifically exempt from design registration. For more information read our information sheet: 'Is my design registerable?'. For a design to be registrable it must...

The usual procedure for registering a design is summarised below. Typical time periods are indicated, but it should be appreciated that the process of achieving registration can be accelerated if it appears your design is being infringed. Interview An interview enables us to familiarise ourselves with the design,...

To file a design application, we require: The full name, address and nationality of the applicant(s); The full name, address and nationality of the author of the design (if different from the applicant); Information about the unique features of the design; and A sample or...

Under the New Zealand Designs Act, where a design is created by an author for another person, and that person ('the commissioner') pays for it, the default rule is that the commissioner will own any design rights arising out of the commission and is entitled...

Design applications in most foreign countries should be filed within six months of filing an application in New Zealand. However, in most cases, valid overseas applications may be filed after this date if the design has not been publicly disclosed. Licences/assignments A registered design or pending application may be licensed...

What is a registered design? A registered design is a proprietary right in a design. It protects the appearance of a new or original design applied to a product, or any part of a product which is made or sold separately (such as spare parts for...